Tutorials

Monday, December 04, 09:00 - 12:30

Tut01: NOMA: a Paradigm Shift in Multiple Access for Next Generation Wireless Networks
Tut02: Big Sensed Data challenges in the IoT: Standards and Leading Architectures
Tut03: IEEE 802.11ay: Introduction to the first standard for 100 Gbps Wi-Fi
Tut04: Vehicular Communications and Networking: Where Benz Meets Marconi
Tut05: Massive MIMO - Spectral, Energy, and Hardware Efficiency
Tut06: On Network Slicing and Network Softwarisation: Enablers for 5G Mobile Systems
 

Monday, December 04, 14:00 - 17:30

Tut07: The Internet of Things: Enablers, Technologies, and Applications
Tut08: Angle Domain Massive MIMO: where Array Signal Processing meets Wireless Communications
Tut09: Emerging Topics in 5G Networks: Simultaneous Wireless Information and Energy Transfer
Tut10: Big Data Signal Processing for Communication Networks
Tut11: 5G and Beyond Wireless Networks: Emerging Concepts and Technologies
Tut12: Energy Informatics: Communications, Learning and Optimization
 

Friday, December 08, 09:00 - 12:30

Tut13: Flexible Radio Access Beyond 5G
Tut14: Stochastic Geometry-Based Modeling and Analysis of 5G Cellular Networks
Tut15: Artificial Intelligence Driven Management of Future Indoor 5G Networks
Tut16: Greening Cloud and Virtualised Communication Networks
Tut17: Fog as a Service Technology (FA2ST): a New Approach for the Development of 5G Applications
Tut18: On the Way Toward Ultra-Reliable and Low-Latency Communications Services
 

Friday, December 08, 14:00 - 17:30

Tut19: Network slicing in 5G networks: Concepts, theory, standardization and practice
Tut20: Challenges and Development for 5G Wireless Network Security
Tut21: Verifying Cellular Network Operations On Your Phones: From Simulation to Practice
Tut22: Sparse and Low-Rank Optimization for Dense Wireless Networks: Models, Algorithms and Theory
Tut23: Practical Software Radio: Leveraging the SDR Revolution for Wireless Communications Applications
Tut24: Ultra-dense Heterogeneous Small Cell Deployment in 5G and Beyond: A Tutorial on QoE Provisioning 



 

Monday, December 04, 09:00 - 12:30


Tut01: NOMA: a Paradigm Shift in Multiple Access for Next Generation Wireless Networks
Presenters: Zhiguo Ding (Lancaster University, United Kingdom), Robert Schober (Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Germany)

Non-orthogonal multiple access (NOMA) is an essential enabling technology for the fifth generation (5G) wireless networks to meet the heterogeneous demands on low latency, high reliability, massive connectivity, improved fairness, and high throughput. The key idea behind NOMA is to serve multiple users in the same resource block, such as a time slot, subcarrier, or spreading code. The NOMA principle is a general framework, where several recently proposed 5G multiple access techniques can be viewed as special cases. Recent demonstrations by industry show that the use of NOMA can significantly improve the spectral efficiency of mobile networks. Because of its superior performance, NOMA has been also recently proposed for downlink transmission in 3rd generation partnership project long-term evolution (3GPP-LTE) systems, where the considered technique was termed multiuser superposition transmission (MUST). In addition, NOMA has been included into the next generation digital TV standard, e.g. ATSC (Advanced Television Systems Committee) 3.0, where it was termed Layered Division Multiplexing (LDM). This tutorial is to provide an overview of the latest research results and innovations in NOMA technologies as well as their applications. Future research challenges regarding NOMA in 5G and beyond are also presented.


Tut02: Big Sensed Data challenges in the IoT: Standards and Leading Architectures
Presenters: Hossam S. Hassanein (Queen's University, Canada), Sharief M.A. Oteafy (DePaul University, USA)

The Internet of Things (IoT) is proliferating on reliable and scalable collection of sensed data. Meanwhile, the growing realizations of Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs), sensing over smart devices (tablets, smartphones) and wired sensors, are all generating an exponentially increasing amount of data. The ensuing advent of Big Sensed Data (BSD) is generating critical challenges. First, collected data is mainly insightful to each deployed network, any "sense-making" processes to be built upon heterogeneously collected data faces significant interoperability problems, exposing challenges with varying quality, data-labelling inconsistencies, inaccuracies, time-sensitivities and different reporting granularities. Second, sensing systems inherently adopt a collect-and-report model, whereby collected data is indiscriminately pushed onto the networking infrastructure, regardless of the Quality of Information (QoI) or its value (VoI). Not only do we face scalability issues, but establishing reliable Information Services on top of BSD is not attainable over inconsistently collected, validated and reported data. Thus, the future of Big Data is hampered by the sheer volume of reported data, its uncalibrated discrepancies, and worse by the flood of redundant and lower quality data. Real-time decision making is inherently built on the efficacy of ubiquitous sensing systems, not on the aggregation of devices that are isolated in operation and management. In a time when important IoT applications such as health Informatics and emergency services require rapid and scalable access to contextual information about patients, mobile crowds and the general public, the status quo falls significantly short.


Tut03: IEEE 802.11ay: Introduction to the first standard for 100 Gbps Wi-Fi
Presenters: Claudio da Silva (Intel Corporation, USA), Carlos Cordeiro (Intel Corporation, USA)

While local and personal wireless technologies have greatly evolved in the last few years, new applications and continued usage growth demand greater throughput and reliability with lower latencies. Augmented reality (AR) and virtual reality (VR) applications, mobile offloading, high-bandwidth connectivity to multiple TV and monitor displays, and indoor and outdoor wireless backhaul are just a few applications that require new wireless technologies that can meet and exceed what current wired and wireless interfaces can offer. To meet the demanding requirements of such diverse applications, the IEEE 802.11 Task Group ay (802.11ay) has been formed to define PHY and MAC amendments to the 802.11 standard that enable Wi-Fi devices to achieve 100 Gbps using the unlicensed millimeter-wave (60 GHz) band at comparable ranges to today's commercial 60 GHz devices based on the 802.11ad standard. In this tutorial, our main goal is to identify and describe the main PHY and MAC elements present in the current IEEE 802.11ay draft standard, including MIMO (SU-MIMO and DL MU-MIMO), channel bonding, improved channel access, and enhanced beamforming training. For each of these areas, we discuss how their design is impacted by millimeter-wave radio propagation characteristics, present the mechanisms defined in the draft standard, and analyze their performance. A brief overview of the IEEE 802.11ad amendment and introduction to millimeter-wave communications are also presented.


Tut04: Vehicular Communications and Networking: Where Benz Meets Marconi
Presenters: Liuqing Yang (Colorado State University, USA), Xiang Cheng (Peking University, P.R. China)
 

Recently, we are witnessing the overwhelming research and development in automobile technology, energy research as well as artificial intelligence towards an era of transportation involving smart vehicles, automatic driving, and electric vehicles. All these urgently call for advanced vehicular communications capable of supporting massive data exchanges at highly stringent latency requirements. 130 years since Karl Benz invented motor cars, and 120 years since Marconi's first demonstration of wireless, time eventually seems to come for the two great human inventions to integrate to revolutionize today's transportation. As such, it is not surprising that this area is gaining significant attention from both industry and academia for its essential role in, and great potential of bringing to reality, the intelligent transportation revolution envisioned in the coming decade. Vehicular environments are inherently challenging with doubly selective physical channels, constrained radio spectrum bandwidth resources, and constantly changing network connectivity and topology. Hence, research in this area is essential for bringing to reality the many demanding vehicular applications that consist of the gateway towards the ultimate connected mobility. In this tutorial, fundamentals of vehicular channels will be comprehensively analyzed, based on which various practical communications and networking techniques will be introduced. Challenges and opportunities in this field will also be discussed to stimulate future research and development from various industry and academia sectors.


Tut05: Massive MIMO - Spectral, Energy, and Hardware Efficiency
Presenters: Emil Björnson (Linköping University, Sweden), Luca Sanguinetti (University of Pisa & Centrale Supélec, Italy)

The next generation wireless networks need to accommodate around 1000x higher data volumes and 50x more devices than current networks. Since the spectral resources are scarce, particularly in bands suitable for wide-area coverage, the main improvements need to come from a more aggressive spatial reuse of the spectrum; that is, many more concurrent transmissions are required per unit area. This can be achieved by the massive MIMO (massive multi-user multiple-input multiple output) technology, where the access points are equipped with hundreds of antennas and can serve tens of users on each time-frequency resource by spatial multiplexing. The large number of antennas provides a great separation of users in the spatial domain, which is a paradigm shift from conventional multi-user technologies that mainly rely on user separation in the time or frequency domains.
 
In recent years, massive MIMO has gone from being a mind-blowing theoretical concept to one of the most promising 5G-enabling technologies. Everybody seems to talk about massive MIMO, but do they all mean the same thing? What is the canonical definition of massive MIMO? What are the main differences from classical multi-user MIMO technology from the nineties? What are the key characteristics of the transmission protocol? How does the channel model impact the spectral and energy efficiency? How can massive MIMO be deployed and what is the impact of hardware impairment? Is pilot contamination a problem in practice?
 
This tutorial provides answers to these questions and other doubts that the attendees might have. We begin by covering the main motivation and properties of massive MIMO in depth. Next, we describe basic communication theoretic results that are useful to quantify the fundamental gains, behaviors, and limits of the technology. The second half of the tutorial provides a survey of the state-of-the-art regarding spectral efficiency, practical deployment, energy efficient network design, and the impact of hardware impairments in cost-efficient massive MIMO deployments.


Tut06: On Network Slicing and Network Softwarisation: Enablers for 5G Mobile Systems
Presenters: Tarik Taleb (Aalto University, Finland)

This tutorial will be shedding light on NFV, SDN and Network Softwarisation, an important vision towards the realization of elastic and flexible 5G mobile systems. The tutorial will commence with a brief introduction of major 3GPP wireless technologies, namely GSM, GPRS, UMTS and LTE, comparing amongst the different relevant architectures and their evolution to the nowadays' Evolved Packet System (EPS). After a short discussion on the basic principles of LTE, the tutorial presents the major architectural enhancements that have been already standardized within 3GPP for supporting EPS. The tutorial will subsequently lay emphasis on the business as well as functional and technical requirements of 5G mobile systems and discuss relevant opportunities, challenges, and expectations. The tutorial will be afterwards touching upon cloud computing technologies, virtualization techniques, mobile edge computing (MEC) concepts, and software defined networking (SDN). The main focus will be towards the evolutionary flow of the network virtualization and network slicing operations through several standard definition activities in the last decade. In particular, we shed light on how network slicing operations become feasible in the next generation mobile networks by boiling down the overall overhead and complexity of a full network deployment. The tutorial will also cover the concept of NFV, detailing virtual network function (VNF) management and orchestration, and showcasing NFV, MEC and SDN as key technology enablers for the creation of elastic and flexible 5G mobile systems. The tutorial will be then describing, using concrete examples, how cloud-based virtual mobile networks can be designed, instantiated, configured, managed, and orchestrated, and that using current cloud infrastructure management tools, such as OpenStack and OpenDaylight. The tutorial will finish by highlighting few open issues that are forming the focus of research efforts in the network softwarization arena.



Monday, December 04, 14:00 - 17:30


Tut07: The Internet of Things: Enablers, Technologies, and Applications
Presenters: Walid Saad (Virginia Tech, USA), Mehdi Bennis (Centre of Wireless Communications, University of Oulu, Finland)

The Internet of Things (IoT) is the most coveted technology of the coming decade. The IoT is seen as a wide-scale integration of a heterogeneous mix of devices ranging from conventional smartphones to sensors, wearables, vehicles, drones, and mundane objects into a single, interconnected fabric that will provide many exciting applications ranging from autonomous transportation, connected vehicles, virtual reality (VR) to smart cities. However, reaping the benefits of the IoT requires meeting unprecedented challenges ranging from communications to networking, computing, and security. The goal of this tutorial is to provide one of the first comprehensive overviews on the IoT, covering its major enablers, technologies, and several of its key applications.


Tut08: Angle Domain Massive MIMO: where Array Signal Processing meets Wireless Communications
Presenters: Shi Jin (Southeast University, P.R. China), Feifei Gao (Tsinghua University, P.R. China)

This tutorial will present recent findings of massive MIMO from array signal processing viewpoint. By looking into angle domain, the system performance can be greatly enhanced, as compared to the conventional method while the conventional headache of FDD non-reciprocity is solved. Besides the theoretical part, the key problems about hardware imperfections, as well as the performance limits and the optimization will also be presented.


Tut09: Emerging Topics in 5G Networks: Simultaneous Wireless Information and Energy Transfer
Presenters: Marco Maso (Mathematical and Algorithmic Sciences Lab, Huawei France Research Center, France), Marco Di Renzo (Paris-Saclay University / CNRS, France), Samir M. Perlaza (INRIA, France), Bruno Clerckx (Imperial College London, United Kingdom)

Efficient energy utilization is among the main challenges of future communication networks to extend their lifetime and reduce operating costs. Networks are generally populated by battery-dependent devices. In some cases, such dependency is relevant at a point in which the battery lifetime often represents a bottleneck for the network lifetime as well. Within this context, wireless energy transmission becomes an alternative to eliminate the need for in-situ battery recharging. Nonetheless, for decades, the traditional engineering perspective was to design separately information transmission systems and energy transmission systems. However, this approach has been shown to be suboptimal. Indeed, a radio frequency (RF) signal carries both energy and information. From this standpoint, a variety of modern wireless systems and proposals question the conventional separation approach and suggest that RF signals can be simultaneously used for information and energy transmission. This tutorial starts from this observation and aims at familiarizing the attendees with the new communication paradigm of simultaneous wireless information and energy transfer (SWIET) in wireless networks, and its associated challenges. The tutorial is divided into four parts. In first part, an historical and technical introduction to wireless energy transfer is given. The second part focuses more specifically on communication techniques and fundamental limits of SWIET, both for point-to-point and multi-user scenarios. The third part extends the discussion to network-related aspects, and presents the modeling and analysis of energy neutral network. Finally, the fourth part is devoted to the introduction of the concept self-sustainable systems and energy recycling strategies, with practical examples.


Tut10: Big Data Signal Processing for Communication Networks
Presenters: Zhu Han (University of Houston, USA), Zijie Zheng (Peking University, P.R. China), Geoffrey Ye Li (Georgia Institute of Technology, USA)

The aim of this tutorial is to bring together signal processing engineers, computer and information scientists, applied mathematicians and statisticians, as well as systems engineers to carve out the role that analytical and experimental engineering has to play in Big Data research and development. This proposal will emphasize on signal analytics, networking, computation, optimization, as well as systems engineering aspects of Big Data. There are three main objectives. The first objective is to provide an introduction to the big data paradigm, from the signal processing perspective. The second objective is to introduce the key techniques to enable signal processing for big data in a comprehensive way. The third objective is to present the state-of-the-art big data applications. This will include classifications of the different schemes and the technical details in each scheme.


Tut11: 5G and Beyond Wireless Networks: Emerging Concepts and Technologies
Presenters: Halim Yanikomeroglu (Carleton University, Canada)

Since the development of 4G LTE standards around 2010, the research communities both in academia and industry have been brainstorming to predict the use cases and scenarios around 2020, to determine the corresponding technical requirements, and to develop the enabling technologies, protocols, and network architectures towards the next-generation (5G) wireless standardization.
 
This exploratory phase is winding down as the 5G standardization phase has already started in 2016. The first wave of 5G standards are expected to be developed during the 2017-18 timeframe, to be approved by ITU during the 2019-2020 timeframe, and to become operational in the early 2020s. As such, it is time to reinitiate a similar brainstorming endeavour towards the beyond-5G wireless networks; we refer to such networks as 5G+ in order to include the evolution of the 5G standards in 2020s and to perform the groundwork for those to be developed towards 2030.
 
The overall goal of the tutorial is to identify the emerging concepts and technologies, and the necessary analytical tools to study. Towards that end, a number of important components will be presented in the single coherent framework of 5G/5G+ cellular networks with a "systems" scope and approach.
 

Tut12: Energy Informatics: Communications, Learning and Optimization
Presenters: Yan Zhang (University of Oslo, Norway)

Energy Informatics (or Internet of Energy, Energy Internet) aims to exploit the state-of-the-art ICT (Information & Communications Technologies) to achieve sustainable future energy systems. The longterm ambition is to tackle the global warming and climate change challenges which requires the deep integration of ICT into smart energy systems. In this tutorial, we will present Energy Informatics basic concepts and key enabling technologies with respect to communications, machine/deep learning and cyber-physical optimization. We will first introduce the main communications and computation techniques, including edge computing and software defined networks for smart grid. Then, we will explain on how machine learning and deep learning can be utilized for reliable smart grid operation, e.g., intermittent renewable energy resources. Finally, we will focus on cyber-physical optimization technique to achieve energy balance in smart grid. The technique is utilized to model and analyze demand response with different objectives, e.g., cost and Peak-to-Average ratio. We also present a new scenario V2G mobile energy networks where mobile vehicles serve as both data and energy sharing nodes. The solutions in this context will achieve highly efficient interconnection among various types of components in the energy sectors, and enable both ubiquitous energy and information sharing on a large scale.




Friday, December 08, 09:00 - 12:30

Tut13: Flexible Radio Access Beyond 5G
Presenters: Huseyin Arslan (University of South Florida, USA)

Today's wireless services and systems have come a long way since the rollout of the conventional voice-centric cellular systems. The demand for wireless access in voice and multi-media applications has increased tremendously. In addition to these, new application classes like extreme mobile broadband communication, ultra reliable and low latency communications, and massive machine type communications have gained significant interest recently. 
 
During the standardization of 5G, one thing has become certain: there is no single enabling technology that can achieve all of the applications being promised by 5G networking. This will be even more pronounced beyond 5G. For this purpose, the concept of using multiple OFDM numerologies, i.e., different parameterization of OFDM based subframes, within the same frame has been proposed in 3GPP discussions for 5G. This concept will likely meet the current expectations in multiple service requirements to some extent. However, since it is almost obvious that quantity of wireless devices, applications, and heterogeneity of user requirements will keep increasing towards the next decade(s), the sufficiency of the aforementioned flexibility level remains quite disputable considering future expectations. Therefore, novel RATs facilitating much more flexibility are needed to address the aforementioned technical problems. 
 
In this tutorial, we will discuss the potential directions to achieve further flexibility in RATs beyond 5G. In this context, a framework for developing flexible waveform, numerology, and frame design strategies will be discussed along with sample methods in this direction. We will also discuss their potential role to handle various issues in the upper system layers.

 
Tut14: Stochastic Geometry-Based Modeling and Analysis of 5G Cellular Networks
Presenters: Ekram Hossain (University of Manitoba, Canada)

The aim of this tutorial is to provide an extensive overview of the stochastic geometry modeling approach for next-generation cellular networks, and the state-of-the-art research on this topic. After motivating the requirement for spatial modeling for the evolving 5G cellular networks, it will introduce the basics of stochastic geometry modeling tools and the related mathematical preliminaries. Then, it will present a comprehensive survey on the literature related to stochastic geometry models for single-tier as well as multi-tier and cognitive cellular wireless networks, underlay D2D communication, and cognitive and energy-harvesting D2D communication. It will also present a taxonomy of the stochastic geometry modeling approaches based on the target network model, the point process used, and the performance evaluation technique. Finally, it will discuss the open research challenges and future research directions.


Tut15: Artificial Intelligence Driven Management of Future Indoor 5G Networks
Presenters: Ramy Atawia (Queen's University, Canada), Haris Gacanin (Nokia Bell Labs, Belgium)

The current reactive actions based on customer complaints and rule-based self-organizing functions will bound to fail in managing future indoor 5G networks. This is due to their low-cost efficiency and low scalability in ultra-dense and uncoordinated network deployments (e.g. residential or enterprise Wi-Fi). These issues provoke new coming challenges and unveil new directions across multi-disciplinary research areas. We envision truly autonomous management of future networks with self-x functions that exploit artificial intelligence (AI) concept. AI will enable the network to understand the evolution of the surrounding systems and create its knowledge while taking the user experience into account. This is done without manual definition of rules or recommendations that typically require domain knowledge. We believe that such AI-driven automation will enable zero touch deployment and optimization for future indoor systems. The tutorial will focus on challenges and requirements in future indoor 5G networks, and introduce to the audience novel network management concepts based on system of systems, artificial intelligence and machine learning. This is followed by detailed use cases for the self-x management with off-the-shelf demonstrations.


Tut16: Greening Cloud and Virtualised Communication Networks
Presenters: Jaafar Elmirghani (University of Leeds, United Kingdom)

In this tutorial we will introduce and discuss a number of measures that can be used to reduce the power consumption of cloud and virtualised communications networks and will introduce methods for the optimum use of renewable energy in these networks to reduce the carbon footprint at a given power consumption level. We will introduce network optimization through the use of mixed integer linear programming (MILP) giving a short tutorial on MILP and build on this and heuristics inspired by it to explore a number of energy and carbon footprint reduction measures including (i) Optimum use of time varying renewable energy in cloud and virtualised communications networks; (ii) Physical topology design considering operational and embodied energies; (iii) Elastic optical networks using mixed line rates and optical OFDM; (iv) Optimum resource allocation and green network design with data centres; (v) Dynamic energy-efficient content caching; (vi) Energy-efficiency through data compression; (vii) Energy-efficient peer-to-peer content distribution; (viii) Energy-efficient distributed data centres for hosting cloud data; (ix) Energy-efficient network virtualisation.


Tut17: Fog as a Service Technology (FA2ST): a New Approach for the Development of 5G Applications
Presenters: Tao Zhang (Cisco Systems, USA), Xiliang Luo (ShanghaiTech University, P.R. China), Ai-Chun Pang (National Taiwan University, Taiwan), Yang Yang (Shanghai Reserach Center for Wireless Communication, P.R. China)

This tutorial will cover the enabling technologies for fog computing and services, with 5G applications as examples. The key topics are: (1) Overview of Fog Computing and Networking, (2) Distributed Resource Allocation in Fog Networks, (3) Enabling Low-Latency Applications in Fog Access Network, and (4) Open 5G Platform.


Tut18: On the Way Toward Ultra-Reliable and Low-Latency Communications Services
Presenters: Li-Chun Wang (National Chiao Tung University, Taiwan), Chin-Ya Huang (National Central University, Taiwan)

In this tutorial, we discuss several key challenges and feasible approaches in supporting ultra-reliable and low-latency communication (URLLC) services in 5G. We first give an overview of various scenarios in 5G followed by update of 3GPP 5G New Radio (NR). Specifically, we will focus on the introduction of URLLC services including their challenges and potential directions in overcoming the challenges. The challenge, is that factors such as transmission losses, handoff delays, and re-routing delays have more severe performance impact when the link data rate increases. We will focus on dynamic resource allocation and intelligent interference management for enhancing reliability, system throughput as well as sustaining low latency transmission. From practical operator's viewpoint, we consider the benefits of 2-step RACH procedure from the viewpoint of reducing latency in random access. Further, adaptive resource allocation schemes will also be introduced in effectively mitigating interference as well as improve network performance. Several technologies including Device-to-Device (D2D) communication, beamforming, etc. are introduced in assisting adaptive resource allocations. Hence, the transmission latency can be reduced. On the other hand, from the viewpoint of sustaining reliability, we investigate how to utilize the spare bandwidth in the networks to manage data transmission with efficient rate control approach. We find that the network reliability and throughput can be effectively enhanced. Last, we highlight the potential research issues in radio and access technologies for supporting URLLC services in 5G networks.




Friday, December 08, 14:00 - 17:30

Tut19: Network slicing in 5G networks: Concepts, theory, standardization and practice
Presenters: Konstantinos Samdanis (Huawei, Germany), Vincenzo Sciancalepore (NEC Europe Ltd., Germany), Oliver Holland (King's College London, United Kingdom)

Network virtualization has led to significant benefits in terms of business support, service innovation, and infrastructure and operational cost reduction. In a 5G context, the pivotal aspect of network virtualization is represented within the newly evolved concept of network slicing, which paves the way for an automated and flexible invocation of network entities end-to-end on specific isolated and/or shared network resources, tailored to service requirements. This tutorial will shed light on network slicing, an important facilitator for the realization of elastic and flexible 5G mobile systems. It will commence with a brief introduction of major 3GPP wireless technologies, namely GSM, GPRS, UMTS and LTE, comparing amongst different relevant architectures and their evolution to the Evolved Packet System. After a short discussion on the basic principles of LTE, coverage of the major architectural enhancements will follow that have been already been standardized within 3GPP. The tutorial will subsequently lay emphasis on the functional and technical requirements of 5G mobile systems, discussing relevant opportunities, challenges, and expectations. After that, it will be touch upon cloud computing technologies, virtualization techniques, multi-access edge computing (MEC) concepts, and software defined networking (SDN). The main focus will be on the evolutionary flow of the network virtualization and network slicing operations through several standard definition activities in the last decade. In particular, we shed light on how network slicing operations become feasible in the next generation mobile networks by boiling down the overall overhead and complexity of a full network deployment. This tutorial will also cover the concept of network function virtualization (NFV), detailing virtual network function management and orchestration, and showcasing NFV, MEC and SDN as key technology enablers for the creation of elastic and flexible 5G mobile systems. Concrete examples will follow describing how cloud-based virtual mobile networks, and slicing thereof can be designed, instantiated, configured, managed, and orchestrated, using cloud infrastructure management tools. Finally, real-world usage scenarios will be outlined, particularly around the novel concept of the Tactile Internet, for example, as a pioneering service that takes advantage of the key Ultra-Reliable Low Latency Communications capabilities that are realized through network slicing in 5G.



Tut20: Challenges and Development for 5G Wireless Network Security
Presenters: Yi Qian (University of Nebraska–Lincoln, USA)

Wireless security is one of the most important topics and attracting more and more attention from industry, research, and academia. Network system security encompasses integrity, authentication, confidentiality and non-repudiation of both user and management information. Unlike wired communication networks that have some degree of physical security, physical security in mobile wireless communication networks is impossible to achieve on wireless links (because of the broadcast nature) and therefore security attacks on information flow are the most widespread. Modification of information is possible because of the nature of the channel and the mobility of nodes. The radio channel is harsh and subject to interference, fading, multipath, and high error rates. As a result, packet losses are common even without security threats. An opponent can make use of these natural impairments to modify information and also render the information unavailable. This tutorial will address all these issues. Special attention will be paid to wireless specific issues, e.g., tradeoffs between security and power consumption, adaptively changing security protocols in response to the radio channel, etc. Secure wireless communications will certainly be part of other advances in the industry such as multimedia streaming, data storage and sharing in clouds, mobile cloud computing services, etc. This tutorial covers the topics on the recent development of security for next generation mobile wireless networks, with focusing on 4G (LTE and LTE-A) and 5G mobile wireless network systems, followed by a discussion on the challenges and open research issues for 5G wireless network security.


Tut21: Verifying Cellular Network Operations On Your Phones: From Simulation to Practice
Presenters: Chunyi Peng (Purdue University, USA)

This tutorial aims to provide attendees with a practical approach to investigate cellular network operations and verify network behaviors using their own smartphones, which was believed to be extremely hard, if not impossible, for the academy, most researchers and developers who do not have special instruments or access to the carrier networks. The tutorial will provide (1) a complete overview of the cellular-network specific information which might be accessible but not exposed to the commodity smartphones, (2) our approach to collect, analyze and exploit the above information on commodity smartphones through a software tool MobileInsight; (3) practical research opportunities empowered through in-device cellular network analysis; (4) three hands-on exercises which then allow all attendees with the opportunity to follow along with the speaker and learn how to conduct research atop MobileInsight.


Tut22: Sparse and Low-Rank Optimization for Dense Wireless Networks: Models, Algorithms and Theory
Presenters: Jun Zhang (The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Hong Kong), Yuanming Shi (ShanghaiTech University, P.R. China)

As mobile data traffic keeps growing at an exponential rate, and mobile applications pose more and more stringent and diverse requirements, wireless networks are facing unprecedented pressures. To further evolve wireless networks and maintain their competitiveness, network densification stands out as a promising approach. By deploying more access points, possibly with different capabilities, we can not only increase network capacity, but also improve network energy efficiency, enable low-latency mobile applications, and provide access for massive mobile devices. However, this will also bring formidable challenges to network optimization and resource allocation, given the highly complex network topology, the massive amount of required side information, and the high computational requirement. Typical design problems will be nonconvex in nature, and of enormously large scales. Thus disruptive techniques will be needed to fully exploit the benefits of dense wireless networks. The aim of this tutorial is to present recent advances in sparse and low-rank techniques for optimizing dense wireless networks, with a comprehensive coverage including modeling, algorithm design, and theoretical analysis. Through typical examples, the powerfulness of this set of tools will be demonstrated, and their abilities in solving key design problems in dense wireless networks will be highlighted.
 

Tut23: Practical Software Radio: Leveraging the SDR Revolution for Wireless Communications Applications
Presenters: Jack L. Burbank (The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, USA), Russell Nadler (The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, USA)

This tutorial aims to provide attendees with a practical overview of hardware and software SDR tools that may be of immediate use to wireless professionals today. The tutorial will provide attendees with a complete overview of the current commercial hardware environment, presenting an up-to-date trade study of commercial SDR hardware platforms. The tutorial will also present an overview of the most popular software solutions, information on their use and tradeoffs to using frameworks as opposed to native software development. The tutorial will then provide all attendees with the opportunity to follow along with the presenters in three hands-on exercises, which will demonstrate various capabilities of the SDR platforms under discussion using the GNU Radio Companion GUI; no programming experience required. This tutorial demonstrates the state-of-the-art in SDR software and hardware tools as well as highlights some wireless communications applications of these tools.
 

Tut24: Ultra-dense Heterogeneous Small Cell Deployment in 5G and Beyond: A Tutorial on QoE Provisioning 
Presenters: Jiajia Liu (Xidian University, P.R. China)

In the emerging 5G communication systems and beyond, we are going to witness ultra-dense heterogeneous deployment of various small cells including micro eNBs, pico eNBs, femto eNBs, RRHs, DASs, etc., which has brought a number of significant opportunities and challenges for academia, industry, and standards bodies. In this tutorial, we are going to address the technical issues on the service and QoE provisioning in ultra-dense heterogeneous small cell deployment. In particular, the first part is theoretical modeling and evaluation; the second part includes load balancing schemes, energy saving techniques, novel interference management techniques, mobility and handoff control, integration with WiMAX and WiFi, the use of unlicensed band, cooperative transmission with D2D links, NFV and SDN techniques and architectures, and privacy concerns and security policies. We believe this topic will be of great interest for IEEE GLOBECOM 2017 and will attract lots of attention from both academia and industry.